RSS

Happy birthday mom!

Happy 52nd birthday mom!!

Her actual birthday was August 20th but we celebrated on August 15th :)

IMG_1433

Even though we celebrated a few days early, I was really happy our whole family was able to spend her birthday together!

Thanks mum for being our biggest support throughout our entire lives and for always encouraging us to be the best we can be doing whatever it is that would make us happiest. We love you!

My sister ordered a key lime cake with buttercream icing. Beautiful scroll work and sugar flowers – they looked so real!

IMG_7607

IMG_7608

IMG_7605

Mommy with Benny – her favourite now

IMG_1446

Proper and complete family photo!

IMG_1453

I don’t… know how my brother does it

IMG_1456

I think the best part of this photo is Franklin, the turtle

IMG_1457

My favourite :)

IMG_1461

Cutting the cake!

IMG_1465

Haha, I swear, we can normal

IMG_1467

IMG_1469

So sweet!

IMG_1470

Franklin wants in too!

IMG_1473

Yum, so much icing!

IMG_1475

Presents and cards for mom!

IMG_7611

 

Tags: , , , , , ,

Surprise week in Ottawa

Aside from my brother and sister, no one in my family knew I had an additional week in Ottawa from August 9 to 15, 2014. Boy was I excited for an extra week with family and friends!

Thank you to my siblings for picking me up at the airport Saturday morning! My mom was working so she had no idea I was home… :)

Got home, showered, and then went over to surprise my grandparents. My grandfather was out, but luckily, I had pre-written up 4 pages (he is deaf, so I communicate via writing) with an update on a number of topics including: getting a job and my elective experience in Nanaimo. My grandma was home so I had the chance to catch up with her and leave my letter for my grandpa and visit later.

Elvin picked me up for… you guessed it, lunch at Shawarma Palace, our favourite. What made it even better? The company :) Thanks Elvin, Jenn, Ruixi, Vinh and Tina for joining me for a delicious lunch! Always so nice to see you guys and catch up.

IMG_7580

IMG_7582

At the end of our lunch, my siblings texted to say my mom was done work and they were going to pick her up. Of course, I needed to come too in order to surprise her! Elvin drove me to my mom’s work in order to meet my siblings. But eek! When Elvin turned in, my mom was already standing outside waiting for my siblings. We did a half duck and hoped my mom didn’t notice us. Phew, she didn’t! We ended up turning around and meeting my siblings in a nearby parking lot. I crouched down behind the passenger side and waited for her to notice. She didn’t. I started tickling her, she thought I was my brother even though he was sitting on the opposite side of the car. Finally, I just started laughing and gave myself away. I told her why I was home and how I had to pay an additional $400 for the flight change. Worth it.

Dinner that night? Poutine from Spud’s. A family size ‘Sugar Shack’ – fries, cheese curds, beer gravy, bacon, sausage and maple syrup – delicious!

IMG_1979

Here are some random moments over the week! There are a few special occasions not mentioned here because they will have a post of their own! :D

Loved getting to spend more time with this guy!

IMG_1980

IMG_1999

IMG_2005

My sister brought a ton of Asian treats back from Vancouver, including Green Tea Aero chocolate – yum.

IMG_1982

With Asian items always comes Engrish

IMG_1986

Everyone was craving my mom’s famous ‘Banh Mi’ (Vietnamese subs). She made BBQ pork and we had BBQ pork banh mi! So delicious, I think we all had subs for days!

IMG_2004

IMG_1995

Enjoyed grape tomatoes, fresh from the garden.

IMG_2012

Mum made coconut sticky rice which was thoroughly enjoyed with sweet ripe mango.

IMG_2007

Wake up guys!

IMG_2035

Can I have some meat with this taco bowl?

IMG_2018

Made blueberry white chocolate scones for the family

IMG_2040

My siblings like to sneak selfies on my cell phone :P

IMG_2053

IMG_2071

IMG_2073

But all like to take selfies too right?

IMG_7586

IMG_7587

Lunch at Art Is In with the family and Janet! Sorry about the terrible backdrop but you can read more about Art Is In here!

IMG_7589

Yummy, green tea ginger ale

IMG_2056

And buffet lunch another day at Eclipse! My lovely siblings ;)

IMG_7597

I had a very special opportunity with the family this week – shopping for a wedding dress with my mom, sister and brother! Although I can’t say I’ve found THE dress, I have now certainly found THE style of dress. Yay! I was very glad to have shared the experience with my family because I honestly don’t know if I’ll have another chance again, especially being in Australia!

After looking at wedding dresses, we went to get donuts at Suzy Q. Same donut with different toppings, not bad but to be honest, I still prefer Tim Hortons donuts. They could certainly do with a facelift!

IMG_7600

IMG_2049

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

My Geriatric Medicine Elective experience in Nanaimo

In summary, it was a wonderful experience for many reasons but primarily because I had a great preceptor. I may have previously mentioned, he is a one-man-geriatric-team who previously trained and worked for years as a GP. He does all the hospital geriatric medicine consults as well as see patients in his own clinic, so I had the opportunity to work alongside him and in both environments.

He was an excellent teacher, he was never impatient with me or colleagues or patients, and always provided good learning opportunities. I especially appreciated that he trusted me with his patients. He believed in my skills, and where they were lacking he helped me develop them. I saw many patients on my own and he always listened to my assessments and trusted my findings and judgement. Due to this, I felt I had the opportunity to thrive and become more confident.

Many of his long term patients said I was very lucky to have him as my supervisor and I do not disagree! His patients loved him as a doctor because he was always comprehensive, understanding, and willing to give as much time as needed.

Through this elective, I also had the opportunity to experience many ‘firsts’ in medicine. Here are a few I would like to share:

  • My first unexpected death. I was sent to see a patient who we were asked to consult for query MI (heart attack). He also had leukemia (terminal, not being treated) and hyperviscosity syndrome. When I came in to see him, he was sweaty, complaining of hard-to-explain discomfort, and extremely restless. He kept changing positions from laying to sitting up in bed. He was a little breathless (oxygen saturations in the high 80s to low 90s) but alert and speaking in full sentences. With his history and symptoms, I immediately wondered if he had a pulmonary embolism (clot in the blood vessels of the lung) instead. On physical examination, my main finding was bilateral costovertebral angle tenderness (often a sign of kidney inflammation/infection) which could also explain why he was in such restless pain. After a few short minutes, he began to quiet down. He laid still in his bed and appeared quite comfortable. I asked him how he was feeling and he said he was feeling better. He think told me to come closer and said, “You know, I have leukemia. And I know, I’m going to die. But it’s okay, I’ve accepted it.” Right after he told me that, he began to have difficulties speaking, opening and closing his mouth but no words would come out. Then, within a span of 3-5 minutes, his blood pressure dropped, he became completely unresponsive, and his GCS (Glascow Come Scale – neurological scale that measures a person’s state of consciousness) went from 15 (max score) to 3 (lowest score possible). His pupils became dilated and asymmetrical. It was just myself and a nurse with him at the time and he was DNR (do not resuscitate). The nurse asked, “What would you like me to do?” I felt so utterly useless because there wasn’t much I could do. I suggested pushing fluids to hopefully get his blood pressure up and agreed when she asked if we should send for blood gases. On previous imaging, he had progressive, chronic subdural haemorrhages (bleeding under the skull, pressing onto the brain) and from his acute deterioration, he must’ve had a massive bleed or other cerebral event. I called my preceptor who arrived within a few minutes and agreed there was nothing more to be done. He died within the hour. The shock of having someone unexpectedly crash on me and feeling so powerless to help was a very new experience to me, and the patient passed away. I had to sit in silence and digest afterwards for at least 15 minutes before moving on with my next task. My preceptor was quite understanding. “You get used to it,” he said, “but it never gets easier.
  • Haemoptysis. The coughing up of blood from your lower respiratory tract. A term I’ve read many times in books. A question I ask all patients with a cough, however, aside from some blood tinged sputum, I have never really seen. We were on call and asked to come see a lady who had a 2 week history of coughing up blood. She was also a First Nations woman and had a previous exposure to Tuberculosis (TB). In addition, she had Takayasu’s Arteritis – an inflammation of the large blood vessels that particularly affects the aorta and its major branches (to the brain, arms, etc). This vasculitis had affected her so much and she had had such extensive previous surgeries to her blood vessels that she now only had very limited blood flow to her brain. If anything were to happen and her heart didn’t pump blood effectively, it would affect oxygen delivery to her brain and she likely wouldn’t make it through without severe brain damage. A lot of interesting factors in this lady’s presentation. While getting a history from her, she started to develop a gurgle in her chest and started to cough, and cough and cough. She brought up bright red blood, even big blood clots. It was the first time I had ever seen true haemoptysis. Not a sight I will soon forget. Throughout her hospital stay, her cough and bleeding eventually settled down, her cultures never came back TB positive and she was eventually freed from isolation. She had a bronchoscopy (a scope to look down the lungs and take samples) which didn’t come back with any sinister findings, like cancer. Whatever caused the bleeding remained a mystery but she left hospital happy and symptom free and promised to return for follow up!
  • Met a man in emergency who had a STEMI (heart attack with characteristic ECG changes) that completely resolved after thrombolysis treatment on ECG. Then it came back! Definitely had to quickly transfer him to the closest facility for PCI treatment!
  • Encountered a pulsus paradoxus (abnormally large decrease (>10mmHg) in systolic blood pressure and pulse wave amplitude during inspiration). This lovely 90yo lady had presented with 2 weeks of increasing shortness of breath and 2 syncopal (fainting) episodes. The doctors who saw her thought she was having heart failure and was fluid overloaded so gave her diuretics and sent her for an ECHO (ultrasound of the heart). Over the course of the day, she became delirious and her ECHO came back with unexpected findings. She had a large pericardial effusion (blood in the sac space around the heart) which was causing a tamponade effect on her heart. Needless to say, once the effusion was drained, she immediately felt a million bucks better. Apparently, I probably won’t come across such a significant pulsus paradoxus again anytime soon in my career.
  • Had a lovely patient who had come in with severe sepsis but also had an ongoing history (years) of hallucinations. They always occurred around the time he fell asleep. They were never threatening but he described them with such amusement and laughter that of course, I joined in. “Oh yes, I see animals all the time. Today, I had a baby goat on my pillow” and “I see birds fly around chandeliers when I look up at the empty ceiling” and “I’m always reaching for coffees and food that are not actually there” and “When I watch TV, I will see another TV screen beside mine playing something else.” Incidentally, he was also found to have liver cirrhosis, splenomegaly, and abnormal blood results (significant of a developing haematologic malignancy) so there was that interesting aspect of treatment and management as well.
  • Had a 90yo lady with such severe aortic stenosis that she was no longer able to get out of the bed without being breathless. She didn’t want invasive intervention but what really stood out for me was her passion in life. She was an avid hunter, baseball player, and loved fly fishing.
  • Did my first trochanteric bursitis local anaesthetic/steroid injection. Probably one of the most easiest procedures I’ll ever do in my career but it was exciting and provided immediate relief for the patient.

Those are just a few of my experiences on my Geriatric Medicine term, I’m sure I’ll remember other ones I’ll want to share! One of the things I enjoyed most about this elective was the complexity surrounding each elderly patient, very rarely are they simple cases. Patients had cardiovascular disease, lung disease, dementia, mobility limitations, falls, frailty, diabetes, incontinence, no social support, etc. Their medication list hadn’t been reviewed and they were on too many or not enough medications. Physical examinations had to be comprehensive – I often did a cardiovascular, respiratory, GI and neuro exam on every patient – and often found incidental but important findings! Some findings include: postural hypotension or gait disturbances that could’ve accounted for falls, heart murmurs not previously mentioned, enlarged liver/spleen, etc. Even though at times it can be overwhelming, it was very rewarding to tease out all the pertinent information and use it to create an all encompassing plan of management.

The best surprise of my elective? My preceptor telling me that he would be on vacation during my last (4th) week on elective and offering me a ‘self-guided learning week’ if I wanted it. The opportunity to go home and spend an extra week with family in Ottawa? I told him that it would be a cherished opportunity, as long as he felt I had worked hard enough and was functioning at a level to deserve it. Yep! And backed up by a good assessment and an agreement to be a reference for me. So happy!

Even though it cost me an additional $400 (I know, it’s ridiculous) to change my flight, it was worth it. My sister was also back in Ottawa from Vancouver, so we had a complete family and quality time together. I was very grateful for this extra time with family as I really don’t know when my next opportunity to visit Canada will be.

Thank you to my preceptor, the hospital staff, and the patients I met for making my geriatric medicine elective such a great learning experience!

 
1 Comment

Posted by on August 20, 2014 in Medicine, The Daily Sands

 

Tags: , , ,

“Hi. My name is Sandra and I don’t update my blog”

Thanks Amin, for pointing out the obvious :P

Hello again readers! It’s been so long, I think my DHAL (Daily highlights and lowlights) series is officially a flop! However, I will still continue to write DHAL posts when the opportunity arises.

I do have quite a few things to share on this blog since my last post including: my geriatric medicine elective experience in Nanaimo, my surprise week in Ottawa, and starting my cardiology elective in Halifax. Please stay tuned! :)

 
1 Comment

Posted by on August 20, 2014 in DHAL, Medicine, The Daily Sands

 

DHAL: July 29, 2014 – Best news ever!

(Note: Sorry, this is going to be a long post because I want to document this part of our journey)

As some family and friends may know, the last few weeks have been incredible stressful for Michael and I as we held our breath and waited for potential job offers for next year.

Since some of you may be unfamiliar with how the Australian system works, let me try to summarize it:

In Australia, the medical degree is called an MBBS (Bachelor of Medicine/Bachelor of Surgery), not an MD like North America. They are, however, equivalent. Both countries have a 4 year program with the first 2 years being course based and the last 2 years being clinically based in hospitals.

Once you graduate, however, it’s quite different.

In North America, you apply to the residency program (specialty training) of your choice in your last year of school, in order to start shortly after graduation. These training programs range from 2 years (Family Practice) to 4-6 years for other specialties. Once you are done your residency, you might chose to do a fellowship(s) to become even more specialized.

In Australia, once you graduate, you must complete an internship year before you receive your full registration. This year consists of 5 rotations: general medicine, surgery, emergency medicine and 2 electives. Following intern year, many doctors do a Junior House Officer (JHO) followed by a Senior House Officer (SHO) year in order to gain experience and get to know seniors in their field of interest before applying to a Registrar Training Program (equivalent to the North American Residency program). The length of the Australian training programs are about 2 years longer, with General Practice being 4 years. Overall, the training takes a few years longer in Australia vs North America.

Now that you know more, here is our story. Both Michael and I want to stay in Australia after graduation and complete at least our internship year. For that reason, we have not completed all the required exams in order to apply for residency back in Canada this year. Depending on how internship goes, we would be more than happy to stay in Australia to complete our training. The problem was, however, where we stood when it came to applying for an internship position.

The state of Queensland has 6 priority groups (you can see them HERE), and jobs are allocated in order of your priority. According to the list, as Canadians studying in QLD, we are Priority 4 (P4). Unfortunately, there are not enough jobs for the number of applicants. Not only did both Michael and I want jobs, we wanted jobs in the same city in order to be together… what were the odds?

In order to apply, you had to preference 16 hospitals in Queensland from 1 to 16, #1 being the hospital you want a job offer from the most. Therefore, jobs are allocated first in order of priority, and second in order of preference. All Priority Groups submit their preferences by the same date. However, P1s get allocated their positions first. Once they have accepted or denied their offers, the remaining spots are finalized and published. At this time, P2-6s have the opportunity to submit a new list of preferences if they wish.

For example, if a P4 listed Hospital A as their first preference, but after P1s have been allocated their jobs, there are no spots left at Hospital A. He or she may choose to submit a new preference list topped with other hospitals that still have spots.

After a lot of thought and talking to our senior colleagues and friends, both Michael and I decided to chose Rockhampton Base Hospital as our first preference. We had read and heard first hand from many people that Rockhampton had many new and continuously expanding facilities, numerous educational opportunities, consistent workplace support, great teaching from senior physicians, and attractive intern to consultant ratios.

This was this year’s Position Status Report after P1s had accepted their offers and P2-P6 had submitted their second preference list. Note the number of intern spots remaining vs the number of P2-P6 who applied.

Untitled

There were 20 spots total available at Rockhampton. Luckily, it turned out not to be a popular hospital with the Australian students, with only 3 people who preferenced it high enough to get a spot. That left 17 spots leftover for the 63 (P2-P6) applicants who had listed Rockhampton first, slightly less than a 1 in 3 chance.

We had been told that unlike P1s, job offers for P2-P6s were not random. We would be specifically selected based on the (unknown) criteria/interest of each respective hospital.

What could we possibly do to increase our chances of getting an offer from Rockhampton? There were lots of rumours, but here’s what we decided to do:

  • We listed Rockhampton as our first choice during the first round of preferencing and didn’t change it. This showed that we were initially dedicated to them, and didn’t chose them first in the 2nd round simply because they had spots left over.
  • We made contact after submitting our application. If we hadn’t been in Canada, we probably would’ve flown up to Rockhampton to meet the recruitment team in person. Since we couldn’t, we emailed them instead – as a couple, which was different. We also didn’t just email them to express our interest. We spent a lot of time and thought putting together a package for their perusal. This PDF package consisted of:
    • A letter of interest. We expressed the reasons why we wanted to be together and work in Rockhampton, and that we would be fully committed if lucky enough to be offered a position. Canadians have been notorious in the past for accepting internship positions (that start in January), then abandoning their jobs in July when they receive acceptances into residency programs back in Canada. We knew it was a black mark against Canadians and wanted to make it clear that we had no plans of ditching our contracts and responsibilities.
    • Photos of us. If we couldn’t meet them, at least we could help them put faces to our names. We also didn’t send traditional headshots, we sent in photos of us as a couple, another difference.
    • Our CVs. We both had our own weaknesses when it came to our CVs, but it gave them a picture of who we were and what we’ve accomplished.
    • Our transcripts. Neither of us had the best transcript in the class, but we worked hard for what’s on it.
    • And lastly, our personal statements. In our application, we had to submit 2 statements: Tell us briefly why you would like to undertake your internship in Queensland or at a specific facility(s) and What are the critical career related experiences you want to pursue in your intern year? We put them in the package so they could view everything together at once, rather than having to look at our application, as well as this document.

These were the photos we sent in:

IMG_1119

IMG_6477

  • We received a response thanking us for confirming our interest and were encouraged to ask any questions. We replied to voice our concern of missing a possible important phone call from them because we were overseas. We reiterated that we were very interested and asked if there was anything we could do on our end to ensure we wouldn’t miss out.
  • There was! We were told that the initial phone call is often made to clarify a few things. The problem with Canadians abandoning their jobs was mentioned and we were given the opportunity to answer the questions we would’ve been asked during this phone call via email, in advance. The questions were:
    • Are you still on track to graduate December 2014?
    • Have you completed the necessary requirements to be considered for an internship position in Canada?
    • Your intentions to commit to Rockhampton Hospital for the full year (at least) if offered a position?
  • We were polite and enthusiastic in all our correspondence, and replied to each email in a very timely manner. The officer asked for our replies to the above questions at our earliest convenience/ASAP and we replied within hours – despite time differences.

Soon Monday, July 28th came around, and I heard from my friend Amanda (who had also applied to Rockhampton) that they were starting to make phone calls. Not with job offers though, they were just asking for answers to the questions mentioned above. Michael and I didn’t receive a phone call that day, presumably because we had already given our answers via email, but we were still nervous.

Then came afternoon/evening of our July 29th, business hours of Wednesday July 29th in Brisbane. This was the day that Rockhampton offers were scheduled to come out. We waited with bated breath. Nearly 7pm my time (11pm Michael’s time) Amanda messaged me to say Rockhampton was starting their phone calls because she just received a phone call from them with a job offer. Congratulations to her, how freakin’ exciting!

But then my heart started pounding. I was FaceTiming with Michael and we were incredibly nervous and stressed. Would we get a phone call? Would it be just one of us? Would luck be on our side and we both get job offers? It was really agonizing.

Nearly an hour later, Michael couldn’t stay awake any longer and he had an early day ahead of him. We said our good byes and he went to bed with his cell phone beside him and volume on maximum in case he gets the phone call.

I was beginning to stress. There are only 17 positions to give away. Surely the phone calls do not take very long. It had been over an hour since Amanda got her offer, did we miss out?

I decided to log onto Skype and try calling my cell phone, just to make sure calls were going through. Yep, it was ringing (as 0000123456) through fine, I quickly hung up.

IMG_1932

Now I kid you not, literally 2 minutes later, my phone rings, from an Unknown caller. I picked up, “Hello, Sandra speaking.”

I don’t even know how to describe exactly how I felt in those next few minutes. Relief and happiness flooded through me as the officer told me she had great news and wanted to offer me an internship position at Rockhampton Hospital for 2015. I really almost cried. I immediately thanked her and told her how incredibly happy I would be to accept her offer. She explained to me that the official offer will be arriving by email in the next few hours and to make sure I respond to it by the deadline.

Before I could ask her if Michael had received an offer too, she said, “Now, I’m about to call Michael next. I have no idea what time it is for you guys over there right now.” I laughed and told her it was after midnight for Michael and he had just gone to bed but don’t worry, his cell phone was right beside him. She was so lovely, she even asked if it would be okay to call to call him at this hour. I said most definitely and that he would be thrilled to hear from her. I thanked her again and we hung up.

Less than 5 minutes later, my FaceTime rang and I knew exactly who it was. I answered to Michael’s beaming face (the officer had told him I received an offer too), we couldn’t believe it! We had beaten the odds, both of us had been offered a position at Rockhampton Base Hospital – our first preference. We were now a statistic – 2 out of the 17 available positions!

Untitled

We were so ecstatic and relieved. We both had a job, and therefore a career and our feet in the door towards our future! Michael said, “Now that we have jobs, we can finally start planning our wedding!” And how true!

The excitement kept Michael awake for a couple of hours talking to me before he could go back to sleep. The sleep deprivation no longer mattered once we found out we had jobs for next year! :P

And that, is the story of the best news I’ve received since the start of my medical degree. Best belated birthday present too :) I have since emailed my referees to let them know the good news and thank them again for playing a part in my future – they were super pleased for us as well.

By now, we have also heard from a number of our Canadian friends who didn’t receive a job offer in Queensland :( Emphasized for us again how lucky we are and fingers crossed for them that they will soon receive an offer from out of state or from the private sector (Commonwealth Medical Internships – CMI).

If you’re still here reading, then thank you for your interest and sharing this happy moment with me!

 

Tags: , , , , , ,

DHAL: July 28, 2014 – My 27th birthday!

Thanks to my lovely sister for spending the past weekend and indulging with me! Unfortunately, it was back to the real world for me and back to Vancouver for her this morning!

On the other hand, happy 27th birthday to me! Gosh, makes me feel old! I spent my birthday in the hospital, working hard and coming home late, just like any other day because no one knew it was my birthday and I felt it unnecessary to share. Despite being alone, I received so much love from family and friends in the form of text messages, phone calls and Facebook messages – many thanks everyone!

Facebook message and photo from my sister

Untitled 4

Received these 2 Pandora beads from my sister. The left one is the Birthday Bloom charm for my birth month. The left is an engagement present and called Forever Entwined. I love them, thanks Jenni!

IMG_7564

Cards from Mike’s parents and my sister (telling me to cheer up)!

IMG_7567

Facebook message and photo from Mike

Untitled 3

Received part 1 of my birthday gift at the airport from Michael. I’ve been wanting a fitbit for a while – it’s a bracelet you wear that helps you track your activity as well as sleep, thanks love! I haven’t started using it yet because I have no one around to discuss it with at the moment. I’m also excited for part 2 of my gift – soon reunited!

IMG_7569

Facebook message and photo from my mum!

Untitled 5

Untitled 2

Before I left Ottawa at the beginning of this year, my mum had already given me my birthday gift in advance – this gold heart Pandora charm. Perhaps she forgot about it and that’s why she has another present for me? :P

IMG_7570

I even came home to a chocolate bar and well wishes from my housemate Lyndsay, thank you! :)

IMG_7574

My first birthday spent truly by myself away from family and friends, but I felt the love!

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

DHAL: July 27, 2014

Had a late start today!

Wasn’t until midday that my sister and I headed out. Today’s plan: Visit Newcastle Island. How? A 10 minute ferry ride that costs only $9 return.

Some sights along our walk to the ferry dock

IMG_7529

Revealed itself during the low tide

IMG_7535 2

Liked the reflection in the water

IMG_7539 2

Beautiful day with lots of boats in the water

IMG_7545 2

Didn’t take long until we got to Newcastle Island!

IMG_7550

IMG_7553 2

A really beautiful island with lots of nice walking trails (approx 8km around the perimeter of the island), areas for picnics and places to swim. Click HERE for more information about the island.

Some photos during our hike!

One of the views off the island

IMG_7556 2

Christmas colours!

IMG_7559

Jenni’s not so much a big fan of hiking, so got bored a little too quickly

IMG_7560 2

Hello!

IMG_7561

Crystal tree droppings

IMG_7569

Lots of easy to walk trails

IMG_7571

More water and boats!

IMG_7575

IMG_7576

Took a rest by the beach, and a selfie!

IMG_7560

Lots of pretty views

IMG_1921

IMG_1923

And lots of people watching :)

IMG_7578

IMG_7584

IMG_7585

You could easily spend the whole day on Newcastle Island, but we had important things to do. Mainly: Buy Nanaimo bars and yummy pastries to eat before the shops closed.

After a few hours, we said farewell and hopped on the ferry back.

IMG_7587

Looking back towards Nanaimo

IMG_7583

From there, we proceeded to Mon Petit Choux Cafe & Bakery to pick up a few goodies for later this evening.

IMG_1925

We then headed back down to the water to enjoy a delicious late lunch/early dinner at Troller’s Fish & Chips. I got halibut and my sister got salmon, it came with fries, coleslaw & tartare sauce. The fish was delightful, such light and crispy batter, went great with the tartare sauce. The fries were good as well, but the coleslaw was so warm! We couldn’t tell if it was because of the temperature, but the coleslaw seemed to have iceberg lettuce in it as well, definitely not as good as it could’ve been.

IMG_1926

We called it an early day after eating and decided to head back to my place. Instead, we decided to watch some of our classic favourite movies: Freaky Friday and White Chicks. Don’t laugh, it was good fun! :P

Selfie on the way home!

IMG_7562

For dinner (and an early birthday celebration), we had delicious pastries from Mon Petit Choux. Top left is a Marjolaine, originally invented by French chef Fernand Point – combining almond & hazelnut meringue layers with chocolate buttercream. Bottom is an Earl Grey Chocolate Mousse, which lost a bit of its shape in the heat during the walk home but retained all of its deliciousness. And lastly, a berry custard danish – yum! To top all of that off, we also nibbled on a Nanaimo Bar – so rich we couldn’t finish a slice together but certainly yummy!

IMG_1931

A fun weekend hanging out with my sister, a little sad that she will be leaving me tomorrow! :(

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

 
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 292 other followers