I’m a 3rd year med student now – woo hoo!

Hello world!

Haven’t blogged in a long time, but this first week in the hospital has been insane!

What? In the hospital you say? Yes!

I’ll just start with a brief blurb about Phase 2 of our medical education ๐Ÿ™‚ 3rd and 4th years are known as clerkship years. Good bye are the daily lectures and hello to real world learning! We spend all our time in the hospital, going through 5 rotations a year learning everything we need to become the best doctors we can be. Each rotation is 8 weeks long, with one week orientation at the beginning and one week for review and exams at the end.

This is my rotation order this year:

rotation orderMy first rotation is Medicine in Society – specifically in Geriatric Medicine at The Prince Charles Hospital (TCPH). I had never been at this hospital and didn’t know what to expect. Additionally, although my clinical hospital is RBWH (5 minutes away) it would take 40 minutes to get to TPCH, ugh!

Needless to say, the thought of starting 3rd year terrified me. Imagining my constant lack of knowledge, being berated by my seniors, looking stupid in front of patients, etc.

This week, however, has been amazing! I am spending the first 2 weeks in Fractured Neck of Femur Clinic. In this ward, we work in a multidisciplinary team to care for patients who have broken their hip and will require surgery, making sure their pre and post-op care is complete.

I feel extremely lucky to have been assigned to a great medical team which comprises a geriatrician (GeriDoc, my preceptor), a registrar (Reg) and an intern (Resident). Mornings are spent doing ward rounds with Reg and Resident (GeriDoc joins us at least twice a week), lunch times are often spent in meetings and afternoons are spent doing ward work.

I have learned an amazing amount in such a short time. The most important thing I’ve learned is not the medical knowledge, but how to work in a ward. Understanding the dynamics of working with other staff members, knowing where to find things, learning procedures and protocols on tasks like prescribing meds, ordering bloods and imaging, etc. Being comfortable on the ward and with others is the first step to success I think!

Reg and Resident have been instrumental in my positive experience thus far, especially since I spend all my time with them, and for that I’m very thankful! They are kind, patient at teaching and do not hesitate to give me opportunities to learn and make me feel a part of the team. Although he’s quite busy, I have also spent some time with GeriDoc and he has been more than encouraging. I will be spending more time with him this week, so I’m nervous but anticipating lots of learning.

My only complaint? I’m so wiped by the end of the day! I leave the house at 7am, get to the hospital before 8. Have a bit of time to review recent tests before handover and ward rounds start. Go all day, sometimes no time for lunch, and finally home around 5-6pm. If I’m lucky, earlier! By the time dinner is over, I can barely keep my eyes open to study ๐Ÿ˜ฆ Slowly getting used to it though!

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