Finally trying out Gunshop Cafe

We’ve heard from numerous friends that Gunshop Cafe is a wonderful place, especially for breakfast and we’ve been meaning to try it out for 2 years now.

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Coincidentally during Meaghan’s stay, there was a 50% off flash deal for Gunshop Cafe! Unfortunately, we couldn’t do breakfast or lunch because of our clinic schedules but anticipated a good dinner.

We were booked for 6:15pm on April 02. The restaurant was still quite empty when we arrived so we were given our choice of seats. We initially sat outdoors towards the back of the restaurant but the lighting was quite dim so we ended up changing our minds and moving inside.

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The restaurant is small but warm and inviting. Although the decor is minimal, it works well and makes bold statements. I especially liked the fan outdoors and how the ceiling lights cast dancing shadows upon the entire restaurant.

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It took us a while to make up our minds on what to order because everything on the menu looked really good.

We settled on drinks first, which was my first disappointment. It was a hot day so I asked for my tea to be iced rather than served hot – never been a problem at other restaurants in the past. Unfortunately, I ended up with lukewarm and extremely diluted tea.

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We started off with the $50 shared plate. I can’t remember all the items, but this plate included: goat cheese stuffed green olives, sorpressa, black pudding, marinated lamb cutlets with romesco sauce, Western Australian sardines. All shared plates also came with olive oil, dukkah, evoo+balsamic, charred sourdough.

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Overall, the plate was really good. Lamb was cooked perfectly and the romesco was delicious. The black pudding was heavily spiced and extremely tasty. The added pickles and mustard were good accompaniments. There were way too many olives as they are really salty and you can only have so many. Meaghan and I aren’t fans of sardines but Mike really enjoyed them.

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But the sourdough wasn’t charred, only lightly toasted which was unfortunate because the added flavour would’ve been really nice. The other disappointment – as we were almost finished the dish, we realized the dukkah and evoo+balsamic was never brought out. A big no no for us – always serve what you say!

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We then moved onto our mains.

Meaghan had the confit duck leg with du puy lentils, potato fondant, roast tamarillo and heirloom carrots. Duck was WAY TOO salty and extremely tough and dried out – unexpected for meat that was supposed to be cooked long and slow in its own fat. Unfortunately, she ended up leaving a lot of it behind.

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Mike had the homemade gnocchi with tomato fondue, evoo, prawns and basil. He enjoyed it, although not very memorable.

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Lastly, I had the wild mushroom risotto with poached duck egg, truffle oil and cress. Oh my goodness, my dish was unbelievably bland. There was absolutely no salt in my dish and we joked that the salt that was supposed to go into my dish must’ve been put into Meaghan’s. Risotto was overdone and the taste of vinegar overpowered my poached egg 😦 Please use less vinegar! When asked how our meals were, I did let the staff know that there was absolutely no salt in my dish, although it went went unacknowledged. I didn’t send back my food because I hate doing that – makes me feel like a total snob but this dish would’ve been justified. Instead, I just added some salt and ate what I could, was already filling up from the shared plate anyway!

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The other thing I didn’t like, which I’ve mentioned before about other restaurants – random salads. Don’t get me wrong, watercress is one of my favourite greens, but when it happens to be placed on all 3 dishes, I think it’s there for decoration and not for flavour. It also makes the dishes look less appealing.

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Dinner started on a high and ended on a low for us, which is too bad. Thankfully we weren’t paying full price because that definitely wouldn’t have been worth it. However, we aren’t giving up on the Gunshop Cafe just yet. The service and ambiance were great, so we will definitely give it another chance – breakfast next time though!

Gunshop Cafe on Urbanspoon

GP: “I can tell when my BP is high”

The last patient I saw the other day was, according to my preceptor, a “heart sink” patient. The kind of patient you see on your list that makes you sigh and hang your head in frustration.

This man had uncontrolled hypertension (high blood pressure – BP) simply because he is extremely non-compliant with his medication. He’s visited the clinic numerous times in the past but doesn’t agree on the importance of his medication, despite detailed explanations each time.

He came in with his wife, who said he still hasn’t been taking his medication and when we asked him why, he said, “Because I only take it when I feel my blood pressure is high.”

We asked, “Do you feel that your blood pressure is high at the moment?”

He responded, “No, because when my blood pressure is high, I can feel it in my ears.”

So we measured his BP, it was 190/80 – which was high, and we told him that. And for the umpteenth time, he was told about the importance of maintaining good BP and that he was at risk of having another stroke – apparently he’s had 3 already, one which took 3 years to recover. He’s also on Warfarin (blood thinning agent) so if he were to have a hemorrhagic stroke (burst blood vessel in the brain), it would be a big one that could potentially kill him or cause major complications.

He laughed and said, “I’ve already had 3, I will just have a big one then!”

His wife chirped in, “If you don’t control your BP, you might die tomorrow! You can’t leave me, I need you!” He replied with another laugh.

Needless to say, the consult ended up a waste of time because the patient refused to take the doctor’s advice. On the way out he apologized with a smile and said, “I’m sorry for my… indifference regarding my treatment.”

Perhaps one of the most difficult aspects of GP for me – knowing that your patients know their behaviours (smoking, not taking medications, etc) are putting them at risk of serious illness but despite your continued efforts, they simply don’t want to change.