My Ways of Being a Better Medical Student

I believe trying to observe the following makes me a better student doctor.

Here are My Ways of Being a Better Medical Student:

(Didn’t realize this post would be so long, so I added some pictures from the internet. Photos are linked to their sources!)

Always introduce yourself – to patients and to other staff members. You’ll be meeting people all the time, under a variety of circumstances, at all times of the day. It is only polite and respectful to let everyone know who you are – even just in case you’re not even wanted! It has happened to me a number of times, sometimes patients just want medical students to sit out from consults. It can definitely be awkward, even scary, to find the opportunity to introduce yourself but you just have to man up, find an opening, and do it! Trust me, I know first hand how awkward it feels, especially when it’s one of your registrars or consultants you’re finally seeing for the first time (maybe during rounds) but completely ignoring you. But, more often than not after introducing myself, people will treat me differently – I’m no longer invisible and even addressed by name, who would’ve thought! πŸ˜‰

Say hello when passing others, and smile. It takes no effort from you and can brighten someone’s day. Win win.

Don’t gossip. And if you must, do it outside the professional environment and out of earshot from everyone else. It makes you look unprofessional and you never know who might be listening. The medical world is small and word can travel fast – don’t sink yourself! You never know who you will cross paths with again and that one person you bad-mouthed could end up being your preceptor, your examiner, etc. If there’s someone I particularly don’t like, I always try to find someone else more constructive to my learning and morale and spend my time with them instead.

Never be afraid to ask questions. It shows you are listening, processing information and are willing to learn. Some people are great teachers and love the opportunity to share their knowledge – they’re just waiting for you to take initiative. Of course, with that being said, there’s always a proper time and place for questions. If someone is having a heart attack, no one wants to hear, “Could you show me how to read the ECG?” And you should really have enough common sense not to ask “stupid” questions that will only make you look bad. If you’re a 3rd year medical student asking, “What’s aortic stenosis again?” you are going to be in big trouble and look ridiculous!

Never be afraid to say “I don’t know.” I have no problems saying, “I’m sorry I don’t know, could you show/tell me?” when I really don’t have a clue how to answer a question I’ve been asked. If I can give an educated guess, I do, but otherwise, there is also nothing wrong with, “I’m sorry, I’ve forgotten, could you remind me?” Sure it’s embarrassing for you, but you will learn on the spot and/or never forget that information again. I’ve lost count how many times I’ve heard, “That’s okay, this way you learn and won’t forget again!” For example, the other week, my surg team was commenting on the long half life of the drug Rutiximab (21 days). The registrar then says, “At least it’s not as bad as Amiodorone! Sandra, what’s the half life of Amiodorone?” I laughed (as if I would know this) and replied, “I know it’s more than 21 days!” Now I will never forget Amiodorone has an extremely long and varied half life of 25-100 days. However, not knowing the answer should happen much less than 50% of the time you are asked questions, otherwise, you don’t know enough and you should go study!

Learn as much as you can on the spot. At this point in our lives, we’re not going to have our hands held and be told what to study. Pay attention on the wards and learn as much as you can – that’s often the useful stuff that you can’t learn as easily from textbooks. Bring paper or a notebook and jot down all the things you learn throughout the day. Write down topics that come up which you need to go home and read up about – follow through with it. Interns are a wealth of knowledge, it wasn’t too long ago they were in the same position as you, ask them questions and listen to their suggestions.

Be keen and willing to learn. Someone who shows they want to learn will be taught more and given more responsibilities. Put in the time and effort you think is necessary for you to reach your learning goals. Ask to participate and ask for opportunities to practice your clinical skills or to broaden your knowledge. Try not to decline a learning opportunity that comes up.

Be that medical student you would want to be partnered with. It’s great when you’re paired with another student who’s friendly, encouraging and easy to get along with, who’s knowledgeable but not cocky, who helps you learn without stealing your thunder, who can shine without throwing you under the bus, who’s not the super keener but not a lazy bum, who’s respectful of patients and confidentiality, etc. But it’s even more important to try and be that person for others. You surround yourself with the people you deserve, so be deserving! πŸ™‚

Bake. Everybody loves home baked goods. If you can bake, you should share that deliciousness. No one will fault you, people will love you.

Keep up with your studying. Cramming doesn’t work anymore. Unfortunately, you have to remember everything you learn and build upon it. It’s hard, I know, I’m continuously working on this point.

Eating is important. But don’t just eat, eat healthy – your body will thank you. Also keep snacks on you – granola bars, nuts, chocolate, etc. They will save your life when you are too busy to take a break.

Get enough sleep. If you function well with 5 hours of sleep, that’s great. If you need 7 hours – make sure you get it. That also means you need to time manage well. Don’t sacrifice your studying or your eating time to make more room for sleep. You really need a balance.

Do things that make you happy. Keep up with your hobbies, take up new ones, see your friends, have quality time with your partner, take time for yourself to rest and relax. Otherwise, you will be lonely, stressed, and crazy.

I’m sure there are lots more that I can’t think of at the moment! πŸ™‚

What about you? Do you have any tips?

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