Day 04: Bangkok – Wat Pho, Temple of the Reclining Buddha

Tuesday, July 16, 2013

As it often happens on vacation, our plans to start the day super early were spoiled by the laziness to sleep in. No worries! By late morning we were on the BTS heading to Saphan Taksin station, which connects to the Chao Praya Express Boat (and Tourist Boat) at Sathorn Pier.

We were headed off to our first destination of the day: Wat Pho, also known as the Temple of the Reclining Buddha.

“Wat Pho is one of the largest and oldest wats (temples) in Bangkok and is home to more than one thousand Buddha images, as well as one of the largest single Buddha images of 43m length: the Reclining Buddha. It is also thought to be the origin of the original Thai massage.”

Tips:

  1. Sathorn Pier is where you want to be if you will be visiting the Grand Palace and other famous temples… very easy to get to there by boat!
  2. If you want, take the tourist boat once (buy tickets at the kiosk), specifically for the narration while traveling down the river if you aren’t familiar with the area or haven’t done any reading.
  3. After that, take the express boat (it flies orange flags, buy tickets on board), not the tourist boat! It’s 15 baht as opposed to 40 baht and stops at more stations along the river!
  4. Unless you want to wear public attire worn by many other sweaty individuals, make sure you’re dressed appropriately for the temples. Covered shoulders and pants below the knees!
  5. Get there early, the later you go, the more people will be all up in your personal space 😉
  6. If anyone tries to stop you BEFORE you’ve reached the entrance, saying that the temple is closed – do not believe them. You are being scammed.

The express boat can fit quite a few people!

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To get to Wat Pho, take the boat to Tha Tien Pier. As you approach Tha Tien Pier, you will see Wat Arun (Temple of Dawn) on the other side of the river. We’ll be visiting Wat Arun later!

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From the pier, walk through the market and just follow the crowd! It’s just across the street, you won’t be able to miss it 🙂

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Tickets are 100 baht which includes a small bottle of cold water – redeem it! It will be nice and refreshing 🙂

“The temple has sixteen gates around the complex guarded by Chinese giants carved out of rocks. Only 2 are open for public entrance.”

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Once you enter the complex, if you want to visit the temple, you will be given a bag to put your shoes in and carry with you inside. If you aren’t dressed appropriately, you will be loaned a robe to wear.

Entrance to the temple

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“The image of reclining Buddha is 15 m high and 43 m long with his right arm supporting the head with tight curls on two box-pillows of blue, richly encrusted with glass mosaics.”

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“The 3 m high and 4.5 m long foot of Buddha displays are inlaid with mother-of-pearl. They are divided into 108 arranged panels, displaying the auspicious symbols by which Buddha can be identified like flowers, dancers, white elephants, tigers and altar accessories.”

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“There are 108 bronze bowls in the corridor indicating the 108 auspicious characters of Buddha. People drop coins in these bowls as it is believed to bring good fortune, and to help the monks maintain the wat.”

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Walls are completely covered in intricate, hand painted murals.

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“Outside the temple, the grounds contain 91 chedis (stupas or mounds), four viharas (halls) and a bot (central shrine).”

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“The main temple/chapel is Phra Ubosatha with Phra Buddha Deva Patimakorn, the principal Buddha it is situated a top a three tiered pedestal under which some ashes of King Rama I are kept. The interior of the Hall is covered with fine murals and the inside of the panels for the windows are covered in lacquer work. This is the most impressive building at Wat Pho.”

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