DHAL: May 19, 2014

So this will be my first, of hopefully many, Daily Highlights & Lowlights (DHAL) blog posts.

In case you didn’t see in an earlier post, I’ve decided to start this series because I was finding it difficult not only to keep up with blogging but also to find interesting things to write about during busy and full-on rotations. I thought this would be a good way to remember the happy moments, as well as the more difficult ones of each day. Hopefully when I look back at these posts, I will be able to see how I’ve grown from the positive and negative experiences on a daily basis.

Highlights:

  • The excitement of starting a new rotation! I’m currently doing my first of 4 weeks in the Emergency Department (ED) at a big tertiary hospital. The best part is, as opposed to the last hospital I was working at (1.5hrs away each direction), this hospital is only 5-10 minutes away by bus!
  • Meeting new people. Not only did I have a chance to meet some lovely classmates, the doctors and nurses I’ve met in ED were also extremely pleasant. Some are very keen to teach and for that I am very grateful.
  • I did a few cannulations, and I’m happy to say… all of mine were successful on first attempt! I’m always a little nervous (especially in a new environment and on the first day) and never want the patient to have be pricked multiple times, so yay!

  • The patients I met and the things I learned from them:
  1. We had a few patients come in with chest pain, some very typical of cardiac pain but there was a lady with such unspecific pain and symptoms that we had to quickly rule out a life threatening aortic dissection.
  2. Met a man who was also having chest pain and syncope on a background of kidney failure needing dialysis 3 times a week. He had the most amazing arteriovenous (AV) fistula that anyone had ever seen – huge with a proximal pulse and a distal buzz/hum.
  3. There was a trauma alert for a man who fell off his motorbike going 30-40km/hr having to suddenly brake and swerve to avoid a collision. Luckily he was completely fine except for some abrasions and a broken L clavicle.
  4. A man who had a pneumothorax two weeks ago and fed up with his pain and shortness of breath. His CXRs were impressive, with most likely over 80% of his left lung collapsed. He initially wanted to manage it expectantly because he didn’t want an ICC. The doctors used a central venous line through his anterior chest and sucked out over 2L of air with instant relief.
  • Talking to Michael. Although only via text, I was happy he didn’t run into any issues during his flight back to Canada. Poor guy was exhausted but there were no issues with his flights and the additional 4-5 hours of driving went well! He shared some gorgeous views of his drive and look, mountain view just outside the place he’s staying at.

IMG_2870

Lowlights:

  • Getting to orientation at 9am to be told that my first ED shift would be from 1-11pm in the Resuscitation/Trauma area. I was so nervous! An evening shift on my first day where I’ll be working with the sickest people that come through the emergency.
  • The constant feeling of not knowing enough. There is always more to learn and things to review!
  • The feeling of exhaustion when I finally got home around 11:30pm. My legs and feet were incredibly sore from standing the better part of a 10 hour shift. Not to mention it was quite busy so I didn’t even take a break! I also need to make sure I stay hydrated as a headache started creeping on in the last hours of my shift.
  • Coming home to an empty house and not seeing Michael. I’m so used to his company so it is awfully lonely when you don’t have anyone to talk to!
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