What’s it like being a doctor?

How’s your job? Do you like it? Are the hours crazy? Are the nurses nice? Are the surgeons mean?

Just some of the repeated questions I’ve received from family and friends since starting work as a medical intern. 😉

I was on the General Medicine ward for my first 5 weeks. Then we went on our annual 5 week holiday (which I’ll definitely tell you more about later) and now I’m currently week 8/10 of another Gen Med rotation. Where has the time gone?!

First day on the job… I knew absolutely nothing and no one, it was fantastic. (Not). I spent every day imitating a sponge as best as I could. Trying really hard not to look too much like a fool while absorbing everything I was seeing around me. Trying to remember patients and their issues, staff members’ names and their roles, which forms to fill and how, where to find equipment and leave specimens, etc.

It was exhausting. For the entirety of my first week, I got home, ate dinner and immediately fell asleep.

However, like many other tasks in life, I gained familiarity and through that, confidence. With time and experience, I’ve even built some competence! 😉 These days, not only do I leave work on time, I also don’t take work home with me AND I can stay up for hours after having dinner!

Some of you may have heard the saying, “Interns are just pens with legs.” The reality is, there is some truth in most medical stereotypes. I mean, we do have to…

  • Make sure the patient list is up to date
  • Write the chart notes during ward rounds and patient reviews
  • Fill out request forms, such as pathology, imaging, referrals, etc
  • Complete the discharge summaries

So yes, a lot of writing is involved. But can you imagine if this pen ran out of ink?

Who would keep people up to date with patient notes? How would patients get their required tests? How would GPs and other doctors know what happened to their patient and what follow up was required?

As the ones who spend the most time on the ward, and through the above roles, we often end up spending a lot of time with patients and their families. We are the first point of contact for nursing staff in caring for patients. We help to clarify questions and provide more information. We listen to and acknowledge concerns, even if only to provide a joke and share a smile. Not to say the senior doctors don’t do all the above and more, it’s still a rewarding experience for us junior doctors.

So yes, we are at the bottom of the totem pole. Some days you feel it, but most days you’re definitely an essential part of the team.

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