Day 04: Bangkok – Wat Arun, Temple of Dawn

Tuesday, July 16, 2013

When we got back to Tha Tien Pier from Wat Saket, we realized, “It’s still so early! Plenty of time to see more temple-ness!” And decided to visit Wat Arun just across the river, which we were saving to visit tomorrow.

Getting to the other side of the river could not be easier… or cheaper! There is a separate, smaller boat that make rounds from Tha Tien to Wat Arun, for only 3 baht and comes every couple of minutes.

FYI: Entrance fee is 50 baht for us foreigners.

“Wat Arun or the Temple of Dawn, is named after Aruna, the Indian God of Dawn. Sitting majestically on the Thonburi side of the Chao Phraya River, Wat Arun is one of the most striking riverside landmarks of Thailand.”

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“The entrance to the temple building is guarded by a pair of impressive mythical giants, similar to the 12 giants in the Wat Phra Kaew or Grand Palace.”

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“The temple is a representation of Mount Meru, the center of the world in Buddhist cosmology. The four-corner prang of Wat Arun, which house images of the guardian gods of the four directions, reinforces this mystical symbolism.”

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“The 79 meter high tower is decorated with ceramic tiles and fragments of multi colored porcelain which had previously been used as ballast by boats coming to Bangkok from China .The porcelain mosaic fills every conceivable nook, cranny, and wall, creating a brilliantly imaginative and visually stunning monument.”

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Wat Arun was spectacular, easily the most impressive temple we’d seen that day. The intricate detail, the steep steps to the top, and the view below!

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Our only regret with Wat Arun? Not being able to come back in the evening to capture that wonderful picture of Wat Arun silhouetted against beautiful sunset colours! Perhaps next time…

In unrelated news: We found a cat napping on site… 😀

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FULL ALBUM HERE!

What did we do after this? Stay tuned to find out! Don’t worry… the day was still young and we were all temple-d out by this point! 😉

Day 04: Bangkok – Wat Saket, The Golden Mount

Tuesday, July 16, 2013

After our visit to Wat Pho, we continued on, walking towards Grand Palace as our next destination.

During the walk, there were many vendors selling historical (war/religious) artifacts like pendants and statues. We assumed the artifacts were real because there were a number of locals using eye magnifiers to inspect the pieces they wanted to buy. I wish we could’ve been able to ask a vendor to tell us more about what was going on.

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And of course, there was food! We stopped for some rice as well as a Cha Yen (Thai iced tea).

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Unfortunately, as we got to the window to buy tickets at the Grand Palace, there was a sign that Wat Phra Kaew (Temple of the Emerald Buddha) would be closed shortly for maintenance.

Since Wat Phra Kaew is one of the major sites to visit in the Grand Palace, we decided to come back tomorrow. In the meantime, we would go ahead and visit Wat Saket (The Golden Mount).

This leads to another tip:

  • Taxi drivers will try to rip you off – don’t let them! If a driver doesn’t agree to use the meter and tries to negotiate a fixed price, get out of there!

Since it was a far walk, we decided to grab a taxi from Grand Palace to Wat Saket. The first taxi we found refused to use the meter and insisted on a 200 baht fixed fare. We laughed and left, and finally found a taxi that would use the meter. Total cost? 45 baht. Although the difference between 45 and 200 baht is only around $5, it was the principle that mattered to us. A couple dollars saved with honest taxi drivers meant there was more money towards something else, like tipping those drivers and trying more local cuisine!

The entrance fee to Wat Saket is 20 baht, very little!

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“Wat Saket, popularly known as the Golden Mount or ‘Phu Khao Thong’, is a low hill crowned with a gleaming gold chedi. Within, the 58-metre chedi houses a Buddha relic and welcomes worshippers all year round.

It is unfortunate, but we weren’t able to get a good shot from the bottom to show you the full view. Here’s a picture from Google to show you what it looks like:

“The temple dates back to the Ayutthaya era, when it was known as Wat Sakae. When Bangkok became the capital, King Rama I renovated the temple and gave it its present name.”

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“Built on an artificial man-made hill, the Golden Mount is the temple’s most well-known landmark and is a sacred pilgrimage site during the weeklong worshipping period in November. To get to the top requires a climb up some 300 steps, which encircle the chedi like a loosely coiled snake.”

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The steps are tiny tiny tiny. I think they’re equivalent to 100 normal sized steps 😉 But the walk up is super easy, even though it’s terribly hot and you will sweat!

“Approaching the top of the hill, you will be welcomed by a wall of bells and panoramas of historic Bangkok.”

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Mike posing silly but I did see other people ringing the bells as they were praying while ascending.

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Shrine at the top

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Panoramic view of Bangkok from the top!

Bangkok Panorama

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We thought we head reached the top, but wait! You can go up a small set of steep steps to the actual top – right up to the golden stupa. We spent some quiet time here observing others and just taking in the city views and refreshing breeze.

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“Before beginning the climb (or if you are us, after the climb), you will find an unusual cemetery built into the base of the Golden Mount. Covered in vines and overgrown trees, it emits a rather spooky out-of-era vibe. Perhaps this is because in the late 18th century, Wat Saket served as the capital’s crematorium and the dumping ground for some 60,000 plague victims.”

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And that marks the end of our visit to Wat Saket!

During the taxi ride back to Tha Tien Pier, we passed by the Democracy Monument. I was able to grab a quick shot from inside the taxi.

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More to come! 🙂

Day 02: Singapore – Asian Civilisations Museum

Sunday, July 14, 2013

Woke up and checked out of Big Hotel (left our luggage there for safe keeping)! Xuan met us for a day of fun before our flight to Bangkok in the evening.

First things first, off to breakfast!

As we walked over to Bugis Village Hawker Centre, we passed by a few sights:

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The Sri Krishan Temple, a Hindu temple dedicated to Lord Krishna.

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Just a couple of steps away, the Kwan Im Thong Hood Cho Temple, one of the oldest Buddhist (1884) temples in Singapore. It is a popular place of worship for devotees of Kuan Yin, the Chinese god of mercy.

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We soon made it to the hawker centre where Xuan made sure we tried many yummy local dishes!

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Iced milk tea

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Fresh deep fried goodness! Ham Chim Peng – a savory, rolled bun with 5 spice. You Tiao, crisp light dough sticks that’s called ‘gio chao quay’ in Vietnamese. First time having it fresh out of the fryer… I am now spoiled. And the Butterfly Bun, slightly sweet and covered in sesame seeds – yummy too!

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This is Poh Piah, our favourite of the morning. A thin crepe-like wrap filled with stir fried turnip, hoisin/chili-based sauce, cucumber, crispy peanuts, shallots, lettuce, egg and more. Bursting of flavour and texture! Similar in style and flavour to one of my favourite Vietnamese dished called ‘bo bia‘… both very delicious!

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Another dish, called Chwee Kuay. Steamed rice cakes topped with preserved radish and chili. Simple and tasty, but not a standout to me. I think it’s because the rice cakes reminded me of ‘banh beo‘ in Vietnamese cuisine – except banh beo is much more elevated in flavour with coconut-based rice cakes often topped with dried shrimp, mung bean paste and fried shallots, eaten with nuoc mam (fish sauce vinaigrette).

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With our bellies happy, we proceeded on foot to the Asian Civilisations Museum!

On the way, we passed through Raffles City and Xuan suggested a pit stop at the Tiong Bahru Bakery for their delightful Croissant au Beurre. Crisp, buttery and fluffy – how I’ve missed quality croissants!

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We continue on with our scenic walk, an opportunity to see the Marina Bay Sands Hotel from an angle we’ve never seen before.

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Eventually, we made it to the Asian Civilisations Museum but didn’t go in until we took pictures of the Singapore River with Boat Quay on the other side.

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The Asian Civilisations Museum (ACM) is the first museum in the region to present a broad yet integrated perspective of pan-Asian cultures and civilisations… opened on 2 March 2003. Occupying over 14,000 square metres at the newly-restored Empress Place Building, it houses 11 galleries which showcase over 1300 artefacts from the Museum’s growing collections on the civilisations of China, Southeast Asia, South Asia and West Asia/ Islamic. These collections include recent acquisitions as well as artefacts inherited from the historic Southeast Asian ethnographic collection of the former Raffles Museum.

And now onto some of my favourite pieces in the museum! (I am too lazy to write out the description of each piece, but if anyone would like to know more, I will be happy to write more!)

Teak Chettinad Door (19th-20th cent) Chettinad region, Tamil Nadu

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Crowned Buddha in dharmachakra (11th cent) Pala, Bihar

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Ganesha

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Sandstone Yogini (11th cent) Pramara, Bijamandal, Vidisha, Madhya Pradesh

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Schist Nataraja (12th cent) Halebid, Karnataka

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Gateway (Late 17th – early 18th cent) Western Uttar Pradesh or Eastern Rajasthan

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Nebula (2003) by Kouichi Honda, Japan

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Carved Human Skull (1900s) Kayan Dayak, Sarawak, Malaysia

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Multi-armed Quan Am (18th cent or greater) Northern Vietnam

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He-He Erxian (17th cent)

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Shakyamuni Seated in Meditation (early 17th cent)

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Plurality of identities of Daoism

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An interactive area called ‘Share Your Insights‘ that allowed visitors to answer a number of questions. These were some of my favourites.

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“Imagine you are about to marry a person whom you have never met. In 5 words, sum up what is going through your mind”

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“Imagine you are holding your baby for the very first time. What is ONE promise you would make to him or her?”

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“Imagine you can make the world a better place, what is the ONE thing you would do?”

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“Imagine you were an emperor. Name ONE value you would promote.”

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“Imagine how you would defeat a centaur who is bigger and taller than a horse to save a bride?”

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Southeast Asian silver

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Trophy and mug

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Gold Malay pendant necklace with Buddhist symbols and Chinese shop marks on reverse

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Peranakan Chinese bridal ensemble, headband, hairpins, lapel ornaments (19th cent) Java

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Shroud (2011) by Jakkai Siributr, Thailand, Bangkok

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And that marked the end of our visit!

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Next, it was over the bridge and through The Fullerton Hotel where we stopped for drinks at The Landing Point. We were a little under-dressed, but that’s okay! We sat outside and enjoyed the view anyway.

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Finally, it was time to head back to our hotel to grab our luggage and head to the airport for our flight to Bangkok at 5:30pm.

But not without stopping for some food! Haha, this time at Parklane Zha Yun Tun Mee House!

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Mmm, some deep fried wontons (but not enough filling), non-soggy noodles and char siew with a side of soup. Great end to our temporary stay in Singapore!

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THANK YOU FOR TAKING CARE OF US XUAN!

We’ll be back, but for now… off to Bangkok!

FULL DAY 02 ALBUM IN SINGAPORE HERE