Rotation 1 complete!

Today I completed my first exam, and thus my first rotation of Year 3 – hurray!

Our Medicine in Society – Geriatric Medicine exam was 1.5 hours with 40 multiple choice questions worth 80 marks, and 1 short answer radiology question worth 20 marks.

The exam was overall fair and representative of what I learned this rotation in geriatric wards. With that being said there were still a number of tricky questions, so hopefully I did well!

Now that that’s over, do I have vacation?

Why yes indeed!

I’m off until March 18, which will be our first week into Rotation 2 – General Practice.

Mike and I are actually at the international airport right now, 3 hours after exam! Heading to Vietnam until next Sunday and stopping over in Singapore tonight. My mom is currently in Vietnam, so we are meeting up with her to visit some family and do some quality relaxing on the beach! 🙂

Plans tonight in Singapore: Chocolate Buffet on the top level of the famous Marina Bay Sands! Mmm, is your mouth watering? Because mine is! We plan to try all 57 chocolate varieties they serve, wish us luck! And of course, we definitely have to check out Gardens by the Bay and photograph the supertree groves! So excited!

We are also flying with Singapore Airlines, so looking forward to a nice and relaxing flight, especially after the exam!

Plan to blog whenever I can during vacation, come back and visit!

Have a lovely day everyone! 😀

MIS: Coming to an End

After an amazing 6 weeks at Prince Charles Hospital learning so much about Geriatric Medicine, my Medicine in Society rotation is coming to an end.

You would not believe how worried and anxious I was to begin working in the hospital this year. The thought of constantly feeling stupid and not knowing enough was enough to get my heart racing. Luckily I was proven wrong. Every staff member I have met at The Prince Charles Hospital has been welcoming and kind. Not only have they taught me so much, but they trusted me and provided innumerable opportunities to apply and broaden my knowledge and skills – I couldn’t have asked for a better experience!

Here’s a review of what happened:

I spent my first 2 weeks in the Fractured Neck of Femur  (#NOF) Service (01/21 to 02/01). All patients in this ward had broken their hip and required surgery and rehabilitation.

Then I moved on to the Geriatric Evaluation and Management (GEM) Unit for 2 weeks (02/04 to 02/15). These patients can have any sort of health problem, and were in GEM for further rehabilitation or waiting for home services to be set up before going home.

Fifth week I spent in the Cognitive Assessment and Management (CAM) Unit (02/18 to 02/22). This ward is more long-term and all patients have some kind of dementia. CAM was an especially unique and enjoyable experience. I got to know all the patients on a personal level and it was admiring to see how the staff take care and handle patients when they are being difficult.

During my last week (02/18 to 02/22), I spent a few days with the Geriatric Referral and Liason Service (GRLS) and some days back in the CAM Unit. The GRLS team takes referrals from all different wards of the hospital to see if patients would be appropriate for transfer to the GEM unit or elsewhere. GRLS was especially beneficial because I was able to learn how referrals work and got to become more familiar with other wards in the hospital.

We now have this week off to study for our exam on Thursday! And also have to finish up our health projects. For mine, I’ve created a medical information brochure for the Fractured NOF Service. I’ve received patient/family feedback and it’s now in the final stages of editing before being submitted to the forms committee.

Overall, I’ve extremely enjoyed my Geriatric Medicine rotation. I have had so many encounters with patients, their families, and health professionals that have taught me more than any textbook could. Thank you TPCH for a wonderful experience! 🙂

MIS: Causes of falls

(In case you’re wondering, MIS stands for Medicine in Society – the rotation I’m currently undertaking, specifically in Geriatric Medicine)

Alright, moving on!

I’m currently in the Fractured Neck of Femur (broken hip) Service. That means, all our patients are elderly AND have broken hips that need repairing.

We admitted a number of new patients this week and as usual, needed to ascertain how they fell. There are a number of factors that can attribute to a fall, either extrinsic or intrinsic factors.

Intrinsic factors are things that are wrong within the body. This includes: balance and gait problems, visual impairment, medications, cognitive problems (ie dementia), cardiovascular problems, etc. Extrinsic factors include anything in the surrounding environment that could cause a fall – stairs, footwear, floors surfaces, lack of mobility equipment, etc.

As you can probably tell, it’s really important to find out the cause of a patient’s fall, because if possible, we want to prevent it from happening again in the future.

Asking our 80+ year old patient:

“And how did you fall?”

“I got blown over by the wind! If you can believe that!”

Resident and I just could not keep a straight face! An elderly woman carrying a pot of spaghetti for her neighbour (who just got out of the hospital) suddenly gets shoved from behind by a gust of wind (easily around 90km/hr during this storm week) and ends up in the hospital – the poor thing! She is lovely though, and her recovery is going well, which is great!

Wind = extrinsic factor 😉